DISASSEMBLY – Removing the floor pans

Today I started to cut out the pasenger-side floor pan. First, I made some measurements from the tunnel to the bolt holes alongside the outer edge of the pan, and from the support structures at either end of the pan to the first bolt holes on the side. This will hopefully allow me to double-check that the new pan is installed correctly, both front-to-back and from tunnel-to-side. If I cut the new pan, say, too short in the front, or if I install it too closely against the tunnel (or not close enough) then maybe I’ll have trouble lining up the bolt holes when I go to put the body back on. Or, the seats will not be in the right place, and might interfere with some other structure in the car. I think the pan would have to be off by more than an inch in either direction to cause problems, though, so some moderately accurate measurements should help me keep it close enough.

REPAIRS – Body Filler Removal

The left rear quarter panel had impact damage from an accident, and there’s a thick (as much as 1/4″) application of plastic body filler over the damage. I want to remove the body filler, and try to correct the dents, at least to allow for a minimal application of (probably solder) body filler.

I hooked up a flap disc to an angle grinder and tried to remove some of the body filler. Seems to work well, although very dusty. Taking the surface down to the bare metal results in scratching and gouging of the metal, but given that the quarter panel is already badly dented, it would need some leading or filler anyway. I wonder if a sander will help smooth down the metal once all the surface paint/primer/filler is removed?

REPAIRS – Paint Removal Tests

The roof of Beavis has some deep scratches and surface rust caused by (I think) running the car through the woods under some tree branches. The paint needs to be removed, and I have a couple of methods to test:

1.) Chemical paint stripper, and some elbow grease with a metal scraper.
2.) A ‘flap’ disc attached to an angle grinder
3.) A coating removal disc like the ones from 3M
4.) Palm sander with coarse sand paper

The chemical paint stripper works reasonably well, but there’s a lot of manual work with the scraper, and it’s not a pleasant chemical. The flap disc removes the paint and primer very well, but also scuffs up the metal a bit much and leaves lots of scratches in the surface.